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Mitchell Pritchett

Played by Jesse Tyler Ferguson

character

Mitchell Pritchett is a serious, low key kind of guy. In other words, he’s the exact opposite of his partner, Cameron. But opposites attract and Mitchell seems to have found the perfect counterbalance for his sometimes uptight, worrying ways. Mitch is an outstanding attorney who won an award for distinguished service in the field of environmental law which sat on the mantle next to partner Cam’s bass-catching trophy.

Mitchell has always been a little competitive with his sister, Claire, and he knows that his dad isn’t completely comfortable with the fact that he’s gay. Guess that’s why it was so hard for him to tell the family that he and Cam adopted a beautiful baby girl. Of course, his family welcomed Lily with open arms. Mitch and Cam’s attempts to adopt again have been an uphill struggle that took an emotional toll. That’s too bad. Any baby out there would be lucky to have such a cautious, worrisome, overprotective, completely loving dad like Mitchell Pritchett.

actor

Jesse Tyler Ferguson currently stars as "Mitchell Pritchett" on the Emmy Award-winning ABC comedy "Modern Family." The show, returning in its sixth season this fall, has earned five Emmy Awards for Outstanding Comedy Series, a Golden Globe Award for Outstanding Comedy Series and four Screen Actors Guild Awards for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series. Ferguson has also received five Emmy Award nominations for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series. In 2013, he was nominated for a People's Choice Award for "Favorite Comedic TV Actor" on behalf of "Modern Family."

A longstanding advocate for marriage equality, Ferguson co-founded Tie The Knot in 2012 with his husband, where they design limited edition bow ties with all the proceeds going to various organizations that fight for civil rights for gay and lesbian Americans. Their first collection debuted in November 2012 and sold out in less than a month. They have released new collections seasonally since and featured ties designed by guest designers including Isaac Mizrahi, George Takei and Tim Gunn. Their next collection will be released this September on THETIEBAR.COM.

No stranger to television, Ferguson received rave reviews and was honored by The Hollywood Reporter in 2006 as one of Ten to Watch for his role on the CBS ensemble sitcom "The Class." His additional television credits include "Do Not Disturb" and "Ugly Betty." Film credits include "Untraceable" and "Wonderful World."

The theatre has always been Ferguson's first love. Most recently, he returned to the stage in Shakespeare in the Park's Summer 2013 production of a "Comedy of Errors" in New York City. His performance earned him a "Distinguished Performance" nomination at the 2014 Drama League Awards.  He attended the American Musical and Dramatic Academy in NYC and made his Broadway debut at the age of 21 as "Chip" in George C. Wolfe's revival of ON THE TOWN. He later went on to originate the role of "Leaf Coneybear" in the Tony Award-winning Broadway musical THE 25TH "Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee" ("Outstanding Ensemble Performance" winner, Drama Desk Awards, 2005; "Distinguished Performance" nominee, Drama League Awards, 2005). He has worked extensively with The New York Public Theatre's Shakespeare in the Park in such notable productions as "The Merchant of Venice," "The Winter’s Tale" and "A Midsummer Night’s Dream" ("Distinguished Performance" nominee, Drama League Awards, 2008), where he performed alongside Al Pacino, Jesse L. Martin, Martha Plimpton and Lily Rabe. Other theatre credits include world premieres of Christopher Shinn's "Where Do We Live" and Michael John LaChiusa's LITTLE FISH. Most recently, Ferguson starred as "Leo Bloom" in "The Producers" at The Hollywood Bowl.

Ferguson is also an advocate and active supporter of the Human Rights Campaign. In 2011, he was honored with the HRC's Media Award, which recognizes an individual for establishing a positive, increased awareness of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender issues in the media.